Thursday, February 25, 2010

The phrase that says it all.

"Vision without resources is a hallucination.
Resources without vision is a waste of time."

My friend RR called the above to my attention.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...
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Anonymous said...

Vision without resources is called eyesight.

geo said...

Good point, anonymous.

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Tore Claesson said...

Maybe it's a side point, but there's this thing a lot of people like to point to in lousy times; meager times lead to break through creative and inventive stuff. I'm not necessarily referring to advertising here. Some point stowards the iPod as such a thing.
Some points to Obama's campaign.
Now, I don;t want to be a pessimist or anything. I think it's a wonderful thing that we try to encourage an optimistic view. It gives hope.
Now. Obama got a lot of free space for his campaign, free muscle, free everything, I contributed too. But the reality is he had a huge budget overall. Dollars. And if you do try to put a money value on the voluntary work he had an astronomical budget.
The successful American ski team in this Olympic Games, to take a more recent story, came through because they could afford to stay on a program that was top notch. Money was important to the conditions. Nothing is free.
Now, iPod came through just when we had the last, mild, recession. Well, it came out then, but it was certainly not conceived then.
Neither was Kennedy's reach for the moon a low budget creative spark. Nasa got the biggest share of the national budget ever in history. Rocket science isn't for free.
That is not to say that a lot of good ideas are sparked in lousy times. But it's a myth to claim that lousy times are good for the development of strong creative ideas. It's just that you can always find some cool stuff done on a shoe string in bad times, as well as in good times. In our industry big budgets are not automatically equal to quality anyway. Although, at the end of the day, the best people can actually demand more, more money, more resources, and get better shit done. Now. I'm sure Albania has it's fair share of intelligent people. They just don't have the same resources as their intelligent peers in the US, Germany, or nowadays, China and India. Now of course, in our little insulated world of ads, a big budget doesn't automatically lead to success. But a good script could die in the hands of lousy non-union low paid actors with a first time, but promising, low price director. However hard they all work. I'm just saying. When people claim good times are bad for creativity they don't respect the fact that we are not all lazy. Some of us actually have a certain drive, that has nothing to do with god or bad times, however, and with a NASA budget some of us could could make wonders. NASA couldn't have reach the moon without a huge budget.
So there's goes the myth. Pop.
Well, ads don't compare to NASA. So excuse me for going over the tip a bit. But I just can't get Jack for a low budget spot no matter how goods the script is and how well he would fit it.

Tore Claesson said...

Maybe it's a side point, but there's this thing a lot of people like to point to in lousy times; meager times lead to break through creative and inventive stuff. I'm not necessarily referring to advertising here. Some point stowards the iPod as such a thing.
Some points to Obama's campaign.
Now, I don;t want to be a pessimist or anything. I think it's a wonderful thing that we try to encourage an optimistic view. It gives hope.
Now. Obama got a lot of free space for his campaign, free muscle, free everything, I contributed too. But the reality is he had a huge budget overall. Dollars. And if you do try to put a money value on the voluntary work he had an astronomical budget.
The successful American ski team in this Olympic Games, to take a more recent story, came through because they could afford to stay on a program that was top notch. Money was important to the conditions. Nothing is free.
Now, iPod came through just when we had the last, mild, recession. Well, it came out then, but it was certainly not conceived then.
Neither was Kennedy's reach for the moon a low budget creative spark. Nasa got the biggest share of the national budget ever in history. Rocket science isn't for free.
That is not to say that a lot of good ideas are sparked in lousy times. But it's a myth to claim that lousy times are good for the development of strong creative ideas. It's just that you can always find some cool stuff done on a shoe string in bad times, as well as in good times. In our industry big budgets are not automatically equal to quality anyway. Although, at the end of the day, the best people can actually demand more, more money, more resources, and get better shit done. Now. I'm sure Albania has it's fair share of intelligent people. They just don't have the same resources as their intelligent peers in the US, Germany, or nowadays, China and India. Now of course, in our little insulated world of ads, a big budget doesn't automatically lead to success. But a good script could die in the hands of lousy non-union low paid actors with a first time, but promising, low price director. However hard they all work. I'm just saying. When people claim good times are bad for creativity they don't respect the fact that we are not all lazy. Some of us actually have a certain drive, that has nothing to do with god or bad times, however, and with a NASA budget some of us could could make wonders. NASA couldn't have reach the moon without a huge budget.
So there's goes the myth. Pop.
Well, ads don't compare to NASA. So excuse me for going over the tip a bit. But I just can't get Jack for a low budget spot no matter how goods the script is and how well he would fit it.

Tore Claesson said...

and as usual excuse my spelling mistskes.

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

Hi,

I am new here..First post to just say hi to all community.

Thanks

REBECCA RIVERA said...

I don't know who said this first. It certainly seems a perfect fit for advertising. I heard the phrase via an NPR drive-time segment re: a Congressional hearing on NASA funding. It was uttered by a former astronaut -- who I believe is now a politician -- who testified that NASA's funding should be cut because the agency doesn't seem to have a mission or direction. As a former air force brat and occasional private pilot, I am saddened by the thought NASA might disappear altogether. On the other hand, the agency doesn't seem to have a clear idea of where it's going or why we should go there.